Rice University offers eighty-nine courses focused on sustainability and solutions to solving major sustainability challenges. In addition, Rice offers 280 courses that include sustainability as a component of the course but are not primarily sustainability courses. Together, these courses span fourty-six of Rice's sixty-five academic departments and comprise 11.06 percent of all undergraduate and graduate course offerings.

Sustainability-Focused Courses

ANTH 332/353 - THE SOCIAL LIFE OF CLEAN ENERGY
This course considers the phenomenon of renewable energy, using a social scientific approach to analyzing the various forces and interests involved in the development of renewable energy projects (such as hydropower, solar and wind) in both the global North and South. No prerequisites required. Cross-list: ENST 332.

ARCH 313/613 - CASE STUDIES IN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN
This course will explore sustainable design from initial sustainable facility concepts and team organizations to enlisting community support and process assessment. The course will develop into details about sustainable design, lessons learned, processes and outcomes. Space is limited and registration does not guarantee a space in this course. The final course roster is formulated on the first-day class by the individual instructor. Cross-list: ENST 313/613.

ARCH 314/514 - TECHNOLOGY III - THE ENVELOPE
The building envelope is the collection of material assemblies that separate a building’s interior from the exterior environment. This course examines the interaction of those assemblies with natural forces such as temperature, moisture, and solar radiation and the details of construction which have evolved to mitigate them. The subject matter includes both traditional building exterior wall and roof construction and newer technologies such as rain screen, green roof, and building surface media systems. This course addresses sustainability issues related to enclosure systems through energy cost and carbon footprint analysis. It is the third of four required courses in the architectural technology sequence.

ARCH 316/516 - TECHNOLOGY IV - THE ENVIRONMENT
This course addresses building environmental systems including power, water, and wastewater with an emphasis on air condition systems. Through multimedia presentations and field trips, students are taught to analyze the thermal environment in a variety of building types and select equipment to meet these needs. Sustainability issues related to environmental systems such as energy, conservation, and life cycle costs are also addressed. This is the fourth required course in the architectural technology sequence.

ARCH 321/621 - CASE STUDIES IN SUSTAINABILITY: THE HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING
The project-based seminar will provide a means by which all those with an interest in the building science entailed in the design of commercial, institutional, and residential structures can investigate common issues, obtain information, discuss local strategies, and otherwise address subjects relating to building or campus performance over its life cycle. To develop an approach of taking an existing Rice University building an optimizing its use via "repositioning" or redesign the class will create an interdisciplinary forum where students of architecture, engineering (structural, mechanical, etc.), and human sciences will potentially collaborate with professional building consultants, materials manufacturers, contractors, developers, owners, and Rice campus facility managers. Cross-list: ENST 321/621.

ARCH 322/622 - CASE STUDIES IN SUSTAINABILITY: THE REGENERATIVE REPOSITIONING OF NEW OR EXISTING RICE CAMPUS BUILDINGS
This course will explore the application of high-performance sustainable design to specific Rice University campus and facility targets. In partnership with Rice University leadership, the team effort will develop"regenerative redesign" approaches based on the investigation of other campuses' case studies. Space is limited and registration does not guarantee a space in this course. The final course roster is formulated on the first day of class by the individual instructor. Cross-list: ENST 322/622.

CEVE 302/502 - SUSTAINABLE DESIGN
The objective of this course is to develop skills in formulating and solving problems of societal development and advancement in light of increasing material, energy and water demands and decreasing resource availability. Sustainable design requires balancing economic, ecological/environmental and social issues to create physical as well as social structures that will work for current and future generations. In addition to learning to apply sustainable design principles to individual engineering and developing projects, students will be challenged to understand the application of sustainable design thinking a the municipal and corporate level. Cross-list: ENGI 302/502.

CEVE 307 - ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
This course explores the physical principles of energy use and its impacts on Earth's environment and climate. Topics will include energy mechanics, climate change, and the environmental impacts and future prospects of various fossil fuel and alternative energy sources. Cross-list: ENST 307 and ESCI 307.

CEVE 308 - INTRODUCTION TO AIR POLLUTION CONTROL
This course will discuss the history of air pollution and its effects as motivation for control of anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere.Topics will include air pollution control strategies and regulations, predictive pollution concentration models, general ideas to reduce air pollution, and specific technologies to limit emissions of criteria pollutants and their precursors.

CEVE 314 - SUSTAINABLE WATER PURIFICATION FOR THE DEVELOPING WORLD
This course is an introduction to several innovative methods of small scale water purification which are appropriate for implementation in the developing world. Through the different components of the course, students will acquire and hone a sustainable methodology for addressing global health problems at the local level. Cross-list: BIOE 365

CEVE 406 - INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
Introduction to Environmental Law is intended to introduce the student to the methods used by the United States and the international community to regulate and/or allocate air, water, and land resources. A key focus of this course will be the emerging area of the law of sustainable development, including the implementation of full price costing, life cycle analysis, carbon cycle analysis, allocation of assimilative capacity and other similar issues. Cross-list: ENST 406.

CEVE 420/520 - ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION RESTORATION
Remediation principles and application of full-scale remediation technologies for restoration of contaminated soil, groundwater, and surface water. Topics include mass balances and distribution of chemicals in environmental media; development of remediation goals through risk assessment; treatment technology selection criteria and costs; groundwater, soil, and surface water restoration technologies; and regulatory considerations.

CEVE 434/534 - FATE AND TRANSPORT OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT
Physical and chemical principles governing the fate and transport of contaminants in the aqueous environment, and the applications of such principles in environmental engineering. Emphasis is put on mass transport and transportation processes in natural and engineering systems. Previous course work in fluid mechanics and calculus through differential equations is strongly suggested.

CEVE 452 - URBAN TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS
Survey of operation characteristics of transport modes the elements of transportation planning, and the design of stationary elements.

CEVE 484/684 - ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT & HUMAN HEALTH
Learn and apply quantitative risk assessment methodology to estimate human health risk from environmental exposure to contamination in air, soil, and water. Students will conduct a series of team projects focused on toxicology, risk-based screening levels, exposure concentration estimation and risk characterization. Cross-list: STAT 484.

CEVE 538 - COMPUTATIONAL NANOSCIENCE FOR GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE
Computational methods such as first principles, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC), classical MC (in Canonical, Grand Canonical, and isobaric-isothermal ensembles), and classical MD in predicting materials formation and properties. Case studies include cementitious materials, metals, and thermoelectric materials. Cross-list MSNE 538.

CHBE 100 - INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING
A series of lectures for freshman that outline how chemical and biomolecular engineers tackle today's major energy, health, environmental and economic challenges by working to provide sustainable and affordable energy, by designing new materials, biological products or medical therapeutics, and by developing production methods that are friendly to our environment.

CHBE 281 - ENGINEERING SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES
Students will work in teams to develop sustainable solutions for energy or environmental problems affecting our Houston and Rice communities.Emphasis will be placed on the integration of engineering fundamentals with societal issues, environmental and safety considerations, sustainability, and professional communications. Prerequisites: Introductory Engineering Courses,or Permission of Instructor. Cross-list: ENST 281.

CHBE 381 - ICT DESIGNS FOR A SUSTAINABLE WORLD
Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have tremendous economic benefits, yet at an increasing cost to society with sustainability emerging as the major challenge. After an introduction, students will work on design projects based on ICT at the nexus of engineering, sciences, and medicine. Cross-list: COMP 381.

CHBE 382/582 - INNOVATION AND SUSTAINABILITY
Topics in the development and environmental economics focusing on how innovation can improve underdeveloped economies and our environment.Introduction to a general framework for assessing the impact of humans on the environment. Environmental consequences of increasing energy use. Case studies showing how innovation information technologies can provide alternatives for sustainable growth.

CHEM 395 - ADVANCED MODULE IN GREEN CHEMISTRY
Experimental laboratory designed to access the health and environmental impact of chemical processes and the strategies to improve them.Offered in the first half of the semester.

CHEM 570 - NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHERS, TEACHING CHEMICAL CONCEPTS VIA INQUIRY I
Using the Concept Development Approach, this course will teach teachers how to engage students in inquiry science and provide teachers with in-depth conceptual knowledge about chemical fundamentals. The course will include hands-on activities and discussions about chemical concepts that include atomic-molecular theory, atomic structure,quantum energy levels, thermodynamics, equilibrium, and bonding. nanotechnology research with environmental applications will be highlighted throughout the course.

CHEM 661 - NANOPHOTONICS, SPECTROSCOPY, AND MATERIALS FOR SUSTAINABILITY
This course will cover the contributions that nanophotonic concepts and advanced spectroscopy techniques can make to the development and characterization of novel materials for energy and sustainability. Students will cover nanophotonic concepts for novel materials and characterization techniques, ultrafast and nanoscale spectroscopy techniques, and applications in energy and sustainability. For each topic, background information will be provided about the relevant science and engineering aspects, as well as examining the state-of-the-art in the topic, via student presentations and literature reviews. Cross-list: MSNE 661 and ELEC 661.

COLL 122 - RESET: ENERGY & WATER SUSTAINABILITY PROJECTS ON RICE CAMPUS (MARTEL)
The purpose of the course is to help students learn about sustainability retrofits and develop proposals for instituting an energy or water conservation project on Rice campus, which can then be proposed to RESET for actual funding and implementation.

COLL 178 - ENGINEERING ENERGY: GRAND CHALLENGES IN SCIENCE & GLOBAL AFFAIRS (MARTEL)
Ever wanted to be Secretary of Energy? National Security Adviser? Have an appetite for solving big problems? Interested in the topic that will shape the 21st century? Engineering Energy explores the intersection of technology and policy and provides students an intellectual foundation to solve the world's energy challenges. Engineering Energy offers an introduction to the technology and foreign affairs topics that will mold our energy future.

COLL 209 - INTRODUCTION TO ENERGY: ISSUES AND INSIGHTS (WIESS)
This interdisciplinary course will provide students with a basic understanding of the sources and uses of energy and the vital role of energy in Houston and the world's economy. By the conclusion of the course, students will understand the important energy issues of the day.

COMP 514 - SUSTAINABILITY, ENERGY, AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH
An interdisciplinary course addressing the energy issues facing computing in the coming decade and beyond. In a student research-driven format we will ask how IT may address its power consumption problem and serve as a vehicle for energy efficiency,sustainability, and reduced carbon emissions across all human activity. Cross-list: ELEC 514.

EBIO 113 - ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS SEMINAR
Discussion of environmental crises. Topics vary annually. Cross-list: ESCI 113 and ENST 113.

EBIO 204 - ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY: THE DESIGN & PRACTICE OF COMMUNITY AGRICULTURE
The course introduces the fundamentals of community garden design and practice. Responsibilities will center on developing and improving the Rice Community Garden. A strong emphasis will be on learning and applying ecological principles to the practice of community agriculture. The class has required meetings outside of regular class time.

EBIO 323 - CONSERVATION BIOLOGY
The course is designed to give students a broad overview of conservation biology. Lecture and discussions will focus on conservation issues such as biodiversity, extinction, management, sustained yield, invasive species and preserve design. Cross-list: ENST 323.

ECON 450 - WORLD ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
The course covers three dimensions of economic development: human,capital, including education and public health; natural resources sustainability, the role of the government budget, savings mobilization.

ECON 461 - URBAN ECONOMICS
Deals with the nature and development of urban areas. The analytical sections of the course deal with the location of firms and households in an urban spatial context, the size distribution of urban areas, the theory of land rent, and optimal city size. Various urban problems such as poverty, racial segregation and discrimination, and pollution and environmental quality are discussed.Other policy questions deal with congestion tolls and efficient highway investment, land use regulation, central city fiscal problems, and alternative educational policies.

ECON 480 - ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
The economic theories of externalities and common property resources are used to analyze how markets, legal institutions, regulations,taxes and subsidies, and voluntary activity can affect the supply of environmental amenities, such as clean air, clean water, and wilderness areas.We also discuss methods for determining the demand for environmental amenities. Cross-list: ENST 480.

ELEC 565 - MATERIALS FOR ENERGY AND PHOTOCATALYSIS
This course will cover the basic physics and chemistry of solar energy conversion and storage devices, and the current state of the art and future challenges in materials for energy and photocatalysis. In addition,physical and chemical characterization techniques will be covered.

ELEC 691 - NANOPHOTONICS, SPECTROSCOPY, AND MATERIALS FOR SUSTAINABILITY
This seminar will cover the contributions that nanophotonic concepts and advanced spectroscopy techniques can make to the development and characterization of novel materials for energy and sustainability. We will cover nanophotonic concepts for novel materials and characterization techniques, ultrafast and nanoscale spectroscopy techniques, and applications in energy and sustainability.

ENGL 358 - CONSUMPTION AND CONSUMERISM
An exploration of the history, philosophy, and culture of eating,drinking, shopping and other forms of consuming. Featuring detailed analysis of literature in English, visual art, music, film, and food.

ENGL 368 - LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
A course that asks the question: How does literature express or shape environmental values? In this class, we will read American fiction and nonfiction exploring the relationship between human and nonhuman nature. Cross-list: ENST 368.

ENGL 459 - TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND ECOLOGY
A special topics course that addresses literature and culture from 1750 to the present, with a view to understanding the new geological era that humans have created, and its ecological implications.

ENST 265 - GREEN WORLDS: SCIENCE FICTION AND THE ENVIRONMENT
Examines the ways that science fiction has expressed and challenged ideas about nature, culture, society and politics and imagined alternative 'green' worlds. Will focus on authors such as Margaret Atwood, Octavia Butler, and Paolo Bacigalupi: films such as "Wall-E" and"Avatar": and accessible secondary criticism.

ENST 301 - INTRODUCTION TO THE ENVIRONMENT: ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY AND ENVIRONMENTAL LITERATURE
This course is intended as an introduction to environmental studies from all divisions of the campus.The course focuses on attitudes and values relating to the environment as represented in environmental history and environmental literature.

FILM 321 - LIFE IN REAL-TIME
This course explores digital video as a contemporary art medium rich with possibilities of cultural critique. We will examine how artists deploy the speed of time-based media to underscore the urgency of specific environmental issues and offer observations on serious issues through the use of metaphor,irony, and humor. We will compare and contrast these ways through reading,films, and presentations.

FWIS 135 - GLOBAL AND LOCAL ECOLOGIES IN 19TH CENTURY BRITAIN
This course will consider the emergence of environmental awareness in nineteenth-century British literature. This course brings Romantic and Victorian literary responses to the environment into conversations with issues such as urban pollution and global disasters. Texts include Frankenstein, as well as selections from Darwin and Conan Doyle.

FWIS 143 - SUSTAINABILITY IN AMERICA
What do we mean by "sustainability"? What or who, are we aiming to sustain? This course examines the American literary and cultural roots of sustainability, a vexed yet popular concept across the disciplines. It engages with demographics, food scarcity, rural life, subsistence agriculture,reproduction, urban development, and population control.

FWIS 170 - PERSPECTIVES ON GLOBAL HEALTH
The course provides an overview of topics in global health, including major diseases, economic and social factors that influence health,interventions, and stakeholders. Topics are presented through the voices of global health leaders around the world, with the goal of integrating multiple perspectives. Readings include public health literature, biography, fiction, opinion pieces, and news stories. This course is eligible for credit toward the minor in Global Health Technologies.

FWIS 179 - AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE ERA OF ENVIRONMENTALISM
What is environmental literature? This course will explore this question by examining major trends shaping how American writers have understood and written about their environments historically, and how those trends continue to influence our feelings towards the environment. Texts include Rachel Carson's Silent Spring and Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild.

FWIS 188 - WATER AND SOCIETY
In our lifetime, the availability of clean water will become one of the most important socio-political and economic discussions to date. In this course we will use resources, including books, journals, newspaper; and film, to understand and discuss how humans and the environment impact water availability around the world.

GLHT 411 - INTEGRATED APPROACHES TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
This is a multidisciplinary course in which students explore the origins, connections, and consequence of social and political tensions arising from the expansion of commercial energy resources in unique and rapidly changing Arctic and subArtic environments. The challenge for the class will be to understand that in matters of sustainable development systemic complexities often give rise to a disconnect between analysis and decision-making. Topics will include the impacts of commercial energy development and drilling in rapidly changing Arctic environments, as well as strategies that can promote sustainable development and improved conditions for indigenous populations in the context of environmental challenges associated with the Arctic meltdown and drilling activities for oil and gas. Methodologies for structuring the analysis to be applied to enhance a systemic resilience of the Alaska environment will be presented. Students will learn to explore the barriers to sustainable development and discuss cost-effective, culturally appropriate solutions energy-related issues by integrating technical, organizational, and personal perspectives. Each class will have formal lectures(s) by Rice faculty or guest lecturer. Registered students are eligible to apply for a summer internship in Alaska. Cross-list: POST 411.

GLHT 448 - TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES FOR ENGINEERING
This is a unique opportunity for engineering students to 1) collaborate with graduate business students to design and disseminate global health technologies; 2) learn about the sustainable distribution of health products in developing countries; 3)have a once-in-a-lifetime trip to Africa that tourism can never duplicate; and 4) help the poor. Working alongside advanced MBA students, engineering students will apply their skills to developing business plans for student-designed global health technologies that may influence dissemination and business plans.

HART 302/568 - FROM THE SUBLIME TO THE SUSTAINABLE: ART,ARCHITECTURE AND NATURE
This seminar considers theories and narratives of nature in the crafting of modern and contemporary art and architecture in the Americas. Artists and architects will include Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Rogelio Salmona (Colombia); Ana Mendieta, Ricardo Porro (Cuba); Ana Maria Tavares, Lina Bo Bardi (Brazil); Mark Dion and Buckminster Fuller (USA).

HIST 125 - SUBURBANIZING THE COUNTRYSIDE: A U.S. HISTORY, 1877-2010
Course examines suburbanization and its role in shaping the environment, culture, religion, race, gender, and national politics. Readings will include works in history, architecture, urban planning,and sociology. Course will conclude with an examination of The Woodlands (Houston, Texas) as a case study.

HIST 328 - POVERTY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LATIN AMERICA
Course surveys the economic, political, social, environmental and geographic origins of poverty and inequality in Latin American countries since independence. It compares welfare policies to promote social justices across these nations and examines their different outcomes in historical perspective.

HIST 399 - THE ROOTS OF UNSUSTAINABILITY: PROGRESS, GROWTH AND TECHNOLOGY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Examines the historical roots of our unsustainable practices and lifestyles in the United States. Major topics will include the expectation of unlimited resources, social progress and economic growth, as well as technological solutions to political and environmental problems. Cross-list: ENST 399.

HIST 419 - THE COLD WAR AND CLIMATE CHANGE
This course draws on recent work in the history of science and technology to understand anthropogenic climate change in relation to the Cold War. Topics include the actual and planned modification of climate and geography with nuclear weapons and climate science and climate change denialism as Cold War bequests.

HIST 425 - 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN CONSERVATION MOVEMENT
Exploration of the American conservation movement from Pres.Theodore Roosevelt, Sierra Club founder John Muir, and Chief of the U.S. Forest Service Gifford Pinchot to naturalists John Burroughs and George Perkins Marsh- focusing on their work in context of current issues in global warming and wetlands restoration.

HIST 570 - U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
Graduate seminar on U.S. environmental history from the colonial era to the 20th century, including the conservation and environmental movements. Students can choose to take this course as either a reading or research seminar.

HUMA 202 - CULTURE, ENERGY, AND THE ENVIRONMENT: AN INTRODUCTION TO ENERGY HUMANITIES
Humanity faces extraordinary challenges in an era of climate change and energy transition.These challenges are not only technological but also questions of value, power,behavior, and understanding. This course draws upon new research across the arts, humanities and social sciences to help students better understand the cultural and social dimensions of our current patterns of energy use, their environmental impacts, and the possibility of new energy futures. Intended for both STEM majors and humanities and social science students. Cross-list: ENST 202.

HUMA 203 - CULTURES OF FUEL
Can fuels (prior to their insertion in systems of energy) offer us hope in the face of climate change? This seminar, open to undergraduates and graduates from all disciplines,will consider fuels (real and imaginary; fossil-based and renewable) in literature, film, art and culture.

HUMA 371 - POVERTY, JUSTICE, AND HUMAN CAPABILITIES
This course provides an overview of the study of poverty, justice,and human capabilities. The course considers theory and economic policy oriented towards improving human well-being in the US, Asia, Africa, and other regions. Readings address not just material deprivations but also gender,racial and ethnic disparities, health status, education, human rights, and political freedoms. Cross-list: SOCI 371.

MGMT 612 - COMPETITION, CARBON AND ELECTRICITY POLICY
MGMT 612 covers the changes that have occurred over the last twenty years in the electric power industry and the challenges and profit potential of efforts to reduce the industry’s emissions of carbon dioxide. The course will use original source materials to explore the impacts of policy choices on companies and consumers. We will cover economics, finance,engineering, and public policy, and a background in those disciplines will prove useful.

MLSC 502 - OUR ENVIRONMENT: SCIENCE AND CULTURE
In this course, students will learn environmental concepts, the science and culture behind them and possible reactions to related problems from a political, economic and cultural perspective. The instructor will introduce the necessary background material in biology, ecology and chemistry as needed but the emphasis will be on obtaining scientific literacy in environmental studies.

MLSC 508 - EARTH SYSTEMS DYNAMICS
This course involves exposing the advanced student to the interactions among the several mechanisms that combine to produce a working Earth. It would include concepts of Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Geology,Meteorology and Ecology.

MLSC 521 - THE SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT
This course is intended to introduce students to some of the central concepts and issues of environmental studies, including environmental science, policy, history and literature - with an emphasis on scientific characteristics of the environment and human experiences and attitudes toward the environment in which our societies exist.

NSCI 501 - PROFESSIONAL MASTER'S SEMINAR
A weekly seminar which serves to provide exposure to local industry leaders from the areas of oil and gas exploration, nanotechnology, and environmental management; introduce career management and business relations tools; further develop written and oral communication skills; provide a forum for students to present internship project results.

NSCI 505 - ENVIRONMENTAL LAB
Laboratory module offered in conjunction with CAAM 353 that illustrates applications of numerical analysis in the solutions of common environmental science and engineering problems.

NSCI 506 - ENVIRONMENTAL CASE STUDIES
Seminar bringing in outside speakers from the community to address environmental issues.

SOCI 304 - ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: RICE INTO THE FUTURE
Students use the campus as a laboratory for learning about sustainability through group projects to reduce Rice's environmental impact or resolve environmental problem. Cross-list: ENST 302.

SOCI 452 - SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT: METHODS AND MEASURES FOR ASSESSMENT
This course examines the measures and methods used to assess the economic, demographic, public services, fiscal and social impacts of large-scale developments such as power plants and other energy related developments as waste storage facilities, retail and warehouse trade developments and other changes impacting the environment.

SPAN 402 - THE CITY IN LATIN AMERICA
This course will explore representations of the city in both new Latin American writings and films, with a special focus on the changing urban landscape, the representation of poverty and the excluded from the new global economy, environmental issues and biopolitics, as well as hybrid cultures and multicultural identities.

STAT 485/685 - ENVIRONMENTAL STATISTICS AND DECISION MAKING
A project oriented computer intensive course focusing on statistical and mathematical solutions and investigations for the purpose of environmental decisions.

Sustainability related courses

ANTH 330 - GEOARCHAEOLOGY
Overview of the basics of the analysis of soils and sediments as related to archaeological deposits, and introducing the key concepts of surficial geology, site formation, landscape evolution, and the scope of depositional environments. Includes practical methods for describing stratigraphy, sediments and soil profiles in the field. Cross-list: ESCI 330.

ANTH 386/586 - MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD AND HEALTH
Food is increasingly understood and manipulated at the molecular level and used in therapy or disease prevention. This course focuses on the fluid intersection of biomedicine and nutrition as changes in agriculture, food safety, and research into the physiological and genetic effects of food alter how Western cultures eat.

ANTH 400 - GLOBAL URBAN LAB – ISTANBUL
Guided independent research with lab component to study questions under the topics of sports, healthcare, transportation, immigration, and urban development in Istanbul and other global cities covered in the Global Urban Lab program.

ANTH 429/629 - ACTIVISM AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
Movements to alleviate inequalities constitute important cultural and political interventions globally. This course examines advocacy practices to create and sustain social movements and political struggles. Cases included grassroots advocacy, NGOs, transnational and technological activism; environmental justice; human rights; gender, ethnic and sexual rights; consumption and globalization; democratization and neoliberalism.

ARCH 202 - PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE IV – EFFECTS
What is the relationship between material, technique and spatial or formal effects? This studio focuses on developing a student’s understanding and experimentation with material and tectonic systems, building envelopes, and issues of sustainability.

ARCH 207/507 - TECHNOLOGY I - THE FRAME
The course will introduce students to historical and contemporary structures through multimedia presentations, computer-based visualizations, field trips, and hands-on experiments with materials of construction and physical models of structures. This course also addresses sustainability issues specific to structural systems such as embodied energy, life-cycle cost, and material recycling. This is the introductory course on the art and science of designing engineered structures and is the first of four required courses in the architectural technology sequence. It is intended for first or second year students interested in both civil engineering and architecture.

ARCH 225 - HISTORY & THEORY I (INTRO)
This introductory course exposes students to issues and debates that have driven architects and theorists from the early twentieth century to the present. The course is structured around a sequence of fourteen themes that have recurred as major issues throughout architectural history. Focusing on topics, ranging from representation, to media, to politics, urbanity, or the environment, teach theme is presented as a debate between differing viewpoints, in order to expose the positions that have motivated both theory and practice.In weekly discussion sections, we will be analyzing buildings and discussing canonical texts. These sections provide opportunities for students to develop their own positions on the issues debated, and to refine their ability to make arguments.

ARCH 301 - INTERMEDIATE PROBLEMS IN ARCHITECTURE I – SITUATION
What is the relationship between the building and larger systems of the environment, constructed and natural, in which it sits and affects? This studio focuses on issues of architecture’s relationship to site and landscape environmental considerations and the relationship between systems and processes across the scales of architecture, urban and infrastructure.

ARCH 309 - TECHNOLOGY II - THE SHELL
This course is the second part of the introduction to contemporary building structures. The topics covered are the design of concrete structures and design of specialized structures including tilt wall, long span, and high rise. Each structural type is explored in terms of overall performance, design of individual components, and the relation of structure to other building subsystems such as foundations, enclosure, and interiors. This course also addresses sustainability issues specific to structural systems and is the second of four required courses in the architectural technology sequence.

ARCH 462 - NATURE IN-VITRO: BODIES, GARDENS AND BUILT FORMS
This seminar considers theories and narratives of nature in the crafting of modern and contemporary art and architecture in the Americas. We will travel from Humboldt's re-imagined geographies, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck's re-formulated notions of milieu, and Xavier Bichat's re-conceptualized human body to 20th century earthworks and current obsessions with ecology and sustainability. Cross-list: HART 467.

ASIA 360 - TRANSNATIONAL CHINA: CHINA AND THE CHINESE DIASPORA
Exploration of the political, economic, and social forces changing the lives of nearly a quarter of humanity, the 1.4 billion people of Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and the diasporic Chinese communities of East and Southeast Asia. Topics include political and economic liberalization, nationalism and urban identity, privatization and consumerism, environmentalism and public goods, and the globalization of communication technologies and Chinese cultural media.

ASIA 438 - GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA
How do everyday citizens develop their understanding of the environmental issues facing East Asian countries who fates are increasingly intertwined with our own? This course examines how the public develops their understanding of sustainability through environmental media with a focus on East Asia. Cross-list: FILM 438.

ASIA 488 - ASIA AND ENERGY
Multidisciplinary study of Asian countries and cultures as to a way to explain production, exchange, consumption and influence of energy on political, economic and social/cultural institutions, including energy security and energy policy formation and resource use theories. Assumes basic knowledge of history and politics of Asian societies and economies.

ASTR 243 - LIVING WITH A STAR: THE PHYSICS OF THE SUN-EARTH CONNECTION
Introduction to astrophysical processes, particularly the effect of the Sun on the Earth.Possible effects of solar variability will be considered, especially global warming. The observational and theoretical basis of our current understanding will be presented.

BIOC 361 - METABOLIC ENGINEERING FOR GLOBAL HEALTH ENVIRONMENTS
Importance of nutritional and pharmaceutical compounds, impact of cost of compounds on global health; Overview of biochemical pathways; metabolite analysis; Genetic engineering and molecular biology tools for ME;Pharmaceuticals and drug discovery approaches (antibiotics, antivirals; anti-parasite compounds); anti-diarrhea treatments; vaccines. Cross-list: BIOE 361 and GLHT 361.

BIOC 424/524 - MICROBIOLOGY & BIOTECHNOLOGY
Structure and functions of microorganisms with emphasis on their environmental, industrial and medical importance.

BIOC 425/525 - PLANT MOLECULAR GENETICS AND DEVELOPMENT
Novel aspects of plant biology and development with emphasis on molecular and genetic mechanisms.Plant responses to the environment and the use of bioengineering and other means to develop new plant products will also be covered.

BIOE 451 - BIOENGINEERING DESIGN I
Senior Bioengineering students will design devices in biotechnology or biomedicine. This project-based course covers systematic design processes, engineering economics, FDA requirements, safety, engineering ethics, design failures, research design, intellectual property rights, environmental impact, business planning and marketing. Students will be expected to compile documentation and present orally progress of their teams.

BIOE 510 - SEMINAR IN TROPICAL MEDICINE
8 week lecture series on topics in global health. The theme for this offering is one health; integrating efforts to obtain optimal health for humans, animals, and the environment.Offered in conjunction with the new National School of Tropical Medicine, the course will feature lectures by various experts on the public health issues most pressing in poor populations in the world today. Cross-list: GLHT 510.

CEVE 310/510 - PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
This course covers principles of water quality engineering, air pollution control and solid and hazardous waste management. Elements of risk assessment, global atmospheric change, and pollution prevention are also addressed to contribute to adequate-level competency in Environmental Engineering. Graduate students will write a term paper and prepare a lecture.

CEVE 401/501 - CHEMISTRY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE LAB
Students will design and perform soil and water collection and extractions for trace concentration of organic compounds and heavy metals. This course covers basic statistics and EPA-certified software for inorganic and organic property estimations needed for data reduction and report writing. Most common measures of water quality are performed by students including pH, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen, and spectroscopic methods.

CEVE 404/504 - ATMOSPHERIC PARTICULATE MATTER
Description and examination of the processes determining the chemical and physical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol particles. Important focal points include aerosol measurements and control techniques and aerosol climate effects. Most attention will be paid to processes active in the troposphere, but important differences between the troposphere and stratosphere are addressed.

CEVE 411/511 - ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES
Study of the chemical and physical processes that govern the formation, transformation, and transport of gases and particles in the atmosphere. Overview of urban and regional air pollution, including tropospheric ozone formation and particulate matter; stratospheric chemistry; and global climate change.

CEVE 412 - HYDROLOGY AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING
Fundamentals of the hydrologic cycle, hydrograph techniques, flood routing, urban system, and open channel flow. Topics in ground water and well mechanics are covered. Includes computational hydrology, floodplain analysis, hydrologic design and local watershed applications. Environmental flows and water quality topics are also covered. Group presentations are required.

CEVE 418 - QUANTITATIVE HYDROGEOLOGY
Advanced course that will provide a quantitative overview of groundwater hydrology. Emphasis will be placed on mastering concepts in fluid mechanics and applying these concepts to water supply, environmental, and geological problems. Cross-list: ESCI 418.

CEVE 460 - BRIDGE ENGINEERING AND EXTREME EVENTS
This course integrates information from various engineering and scientific disciplines to provide a rational basis for bridge design under regular and extreme loading. It provides an introduction to bridge engineering, including bridge systems, construction material, loading, and reliability-based design. Design, analysis, and retrofit for seismic and coastal threats will be introduced.

CEVE 480 - SENIOR DESIGN
The capstone designed course in the Spring Semester will provide senior engineering students with a complete designed experience including fundamental design issues in the major areas of the curriculum, small team experiences, project proposals, progress reports and presentations, design software and computations, major report writing, and a final presentation to the CEE faculty and an external jury of professional engineers. An established local firm will assist in teaching practical design methods and consultation with other faculty is required as part of the overall experience.

CHEM 425 - ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY
This course covers the organic geochemistry of the natural environment. Topics include: production, transport, decomposition, and storage of organic matter in the marine and terrestrial environments, use of isotopes to track biogeochemical processes and natural and perturbed carbon cycle issues, including past and recent climate shifts. Cross-list: ENST 425 and ESCI 425.

COLL 139 - THE RISE AND FALL OF SOCIETIES (BAKER)
The course will examine the theory of environmental determinism, focusing on the role of geography in the rise and fall of historical civilizations. Students will read and evaluate excerpts from Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel and Collapse, and scholarly articles by prominent cultural evolutionists.

COMP 518 - ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN MODERN SYSTEMS
Energy efficiency has become critically important for modern computing systems, from battery-powered mobile devices to wall-powered high-performance servers. The course presents the fundamentals of energy characteristics of modern systems, and introduces basic energy-saving mechanisms and methodologies for system energy characterization. It also covers emerging technologies in energy-efficient design. Cross-list: ELEC 518.

EBIO 179 - INTRODUCTION TO AQUATIC ECOLOGY WITH SCUBA
Students will learn the fundamentals of coastal and reef ecosystems, be introduced to underwater fieldwork and become PADI certified in the basics of SCUBA. An additional course fee that ranges from $425 to $725, depending on the equipment needs of the student, is associated with the class. Cross-list: ENST 179 and LPCR 179.

EBIO 213 - INTRO LAB MODEL ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY
Experimental,laboratory, and field studies of natural history, ecology, evolution, and animal behavior. Course will begin after Spring Break in the Spring Semester.Class has required meetings outside of regular class time.

EBIO 270/570 - ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT
This course will focus on applied ecosystem topics including relations with state and federal agencies, field studies, wetland delineations, permitting compliance, and environmental regulations.

ECON 437 - ENERGY ECONOMICS
Discussion of key aspects in the supply and demand of energy. Topics include optimal extraction of depletable resources, transportation, storage, end-use and efficiency, and the relationship between economic activity, energy, and the environment. Cross-list: ENST 437.

ECON 447/547 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN ENERGY ECONOMICS
A detailed development and analysis of topics in energy modeling. Topics include optimal extraction of depletable resources, models of storable energy commodities, energy demand beyond-use sector, models of non-competitive behavior, energy security and the relationship between energy and commodity prices.

ECON 479 - ECONOMIC MODELING AND PUBLIC POLICYEconomists and policymakers often use computable general equilibrium (CGE) models to analyze the economic effects of public policy reforms. This course examines theoretical aspects of general equilibrium modeling, constructs some basic CGE models, and shows how the models are used to analyze the efficiency, distributional, and transitional effects of various policy reforms. Federal tax reform in the U.S.is the primary policy application; other issues examined may include Social Security, environmental policy, and international trade.

ELEC 365 - NANOMATERIALS FOR ENERGY
This course will introduce students to the fundamental science of nanomaterials. Many of the concepts will be explained by drawing from applications in sustainability(photovoltaics, solar-to-fuel conversion thermionic, thermoelectric, fuel cells). Students will design a lab demo from scratch using among others the infrastructure provided by the photonics measurement lab. Cross-list: MSNE 365.

ENGI 120 - INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN
Students learn the engineering design process and use it to solve meaningful problems drawn from the community and around the world. Teams of students evaluate design requirements and construct innovative solutions in the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen. Students develop teaming and communication skills.

ENGI 205 - TOPICS IN GLOBAL LEADERSHIP & TECHNOLOGY - INNOVATE: TECHNOLOGY GLOBALIZATION & INNOVATION IN CHINA
Preparatory course for the INNOVATE: Technology, Globalization, and Innovation Conference in Asia for undergraduate and graduate engineering, science, and technical students. This course is focused on understanding globalization and technology with a particular emphasis on the host country for the current year’s INNOVATE program. The course examines the relationship between technology, globalization, and leadership in the contemporary marketplace. The first part of the course is focused on preparing students for the intensive, 10-day study tour of the host country that will occur near the spring break and the last part of the course is focused on reflections of that study tour and a better understanding of issues facing both the U.S. and Asia. Each week will focus on a relevant topic: history and politics, economics, contemporary culture and demographics, and technology trends. During the program abroad students will interact with key leaders during site visits to a range of engineering, scientific, and technical companies. The program abroad will include delegates from U.S. and Asian partner institutions enabling students to consider issues surrounding globalization, technology, and innovation from a truly global perspective.

ENGI 314 - RCEL SEMINAR
The RCEL (Rice Center for Engineering Leadership) Seminar addresses pressing topics of broad interest, aimed at helping students understand their academic work in the context of global challenges. Topics vary from semester to semester. Active participation is required.

ENGL 278 - MEDICINE IN THE AGE OF NETWORKED INTELLIGENCE
This course imagines and predicts the future of medicine at its evolving intersection with technology.Examines how developments in mobile, social, personal and global health are transforming medical research, communication, practice. Emphasis on active learning through hands-on creative projects. Topics include social media,quantified self, big data, ethics, doctor-patient relationship.

ENST 315 - ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
An overview of environmental health issues including discussion of epidemiologic methods, illnesses caused or exacerbated by environmental exposures, and the role of research in driving effective policies to protect and promote public health.The class includes numerous guest lectures by area experts (physicians, researchers, community activists, policymakers and others); a bus tour featuring disproportionately affected neighborhoods as well as cutting-edge“green” initiatives; original student research projects; and an opportunity to address the Houston City Council. The dynamic between research and action, i.e., “making a difference,” is stressed.

ESCI 101 - THE EARTH
Study of the nature of the Earth and its processes. Cross-list: ENST 101.

ESCI 102 - HISTORY OF THE EARTH AND LIFE
Study of Earth's systems over the past 4.6 billion years. Topics include evolution of life, continents, ocean basins and climate. Cross-list: ENST 102.

ESCI 114 - NATURAL DISASTER SEMINAR
Seminar topics vary by term. Cross-list: ENST 114.

ESCI 201 - THE SCIENCE BEHIND EARTH GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE
The course will introduce the students to the science behind last century Earth global warming in the context of the past records of global Earth climate variability and forecast of Earth climate in the next century. Cross-list: ENST 201.

ESCI 106 - INVESTIGATING EARTH'S SURFACE
This course will be investigation-based course covering processes on Earth's surface, such as carbon cycling, ocean and atmospheric circulation, and climate change. Lectures will be minimal. Most work will be in-class assignments.

ESCI 107 - OCEANS AND GLOBAL CHANGE
Overview of the impact of the ocean and ocean evolution on the Earth's climate. Includes geological, physical, chemical, and biological aspects of change.

ESCI 110 - ENERGY, THE ENVIRONMENT, AND SOCIETY
Undergraduate seminar on current issues in energy used by industrial society, energy resources and their impact on the environment. Offered on demand.

ESCI 340 - GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES
This course introduces students to the coupled nature of the biosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere using as focal points elemental cycles such as those of carbon and nitrogen. This is a writing-intensive class, and will include 3 required Saturday field trips. Cross-list: EBIO 340 and ENST 340.

ESCI 380 - VISUALIZING NATURE
An experimental course combining the scientific disciplines of the earth sciences with the artistic disciplines of creative photography to study the natural landscape and related ecosystems. The course will combine classroom lectures and laboratory demonstrations in geoscience with classes in the use of digital and film-based cameras and illustrated lectures on recognized achievements in landscape photography. Extensive field trips will be scheduled. Students will travel frequently, at times in pairs, other times in larger groups and as a full class, accompanied by one or both professors. The budget for the course includes funding both for travel and for photography expenses. Cross-list: FOTO 390.

ESCI 424 - EARTH SCIENCE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
Interrelations between humans and the geologic environment. This course explores theories and problems of chemical hazards in the environment; topics, e.g., groundwater pollution, soils, CO2 - sequestration, waste deposits.

ESCI 544 - HYDROCARBON EXPLORATION
A student team will analyze and assess petroleum prospects in a hydrocarbon prospective area. The team will be provided with a dataset including real industry 3D and 2D seismic data, well log data, and etc.The team will have 8 weeks to analyze the data, identify and prioritize exploration targets, and prepare a formal presentation for exploration management in an imaginary oil company.

FREN 323 - FROM EXISTENTIALISM TO CYBERPUNK
Films and novels. Investigations of human consciousness, subjectivity and identity -- from Sartre's existentialism of the "absurd", through Robbe-Grillet's"anti-humanism", to the cyberpunk science-fictional studies of"post-humanity", genetic manipulation, environmental collapse and post-religious mysticism, by contemporary figures like Dantec and Houellebecq.

FWIS 146 - EARTH SCIENCE IN ACTION
Students will develop effective written and oral communication while learning about exciting Earth science problems (e.g., earthquakes, tsunami, climate, sea level). The course will introduce the science, and will train students how to organize a scientific argument, compose and edit a research paper, and give an oral presentation.

HIST 321 - U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
An introduction to the interaction between humans and the natural environment in the present United States from the colonial era to recent environmentalism. The course will center on discussion and writing; readings will include primary sources as well as secondary analysis.

HIST 417 - PERSPECTIVES ON SILICON VALLEY
Examines the history of microelectronics, biotechnology, and the software industry through the lens of Silicon Valley. Topics include: the role of universities and government in innovation; labor and environmental issues; growth of Bay Area venture capital and libertarian technophilia; and other regions' use of Silicon Valley as a model.

HIST 418 - SCIENCE,TECHNOLOGY & COLD WAR
Research seminar will examine the mobilization of science and engineering in World War II and the ensuing confrontation between capitalism and communism. Topics include the Nuclear Age, science and diplomacy, the new American university, scientists and McCarthyism, the space race, socialism and social science, and the counterculture in environmentalism, biotechnology and computing.

HUMA 320 - FROM PHYSICS LABS TO OIL FUTURES: SOCIAL STUDIES OF ENERGY
How did whale oil be replaced by fossil fuels? What were the turning points in implementing electricity networks within urban centers? What is the role of markets and industries when producing such new energy infrastructures? This interdisciplinary course will trace ideas of energy in anthropology, science and technology studies, literary studies and environmental history, and investigate how energy production and consumption affects social life.

HURC 302 - HURC CULTURES OF ENERGY UNDERGRADUATE COURSE
HRC Cultures of Energy undergraduate course requires students to attend a series of lectures by leading energy humanists and participate in monthly interdisciplinary discussion groups.

LPAP 117 - INTRODUCTION TO OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP
This is a survey course that addresses the theory and practice of outdoor leadership. It will explore such topics as outdoor trip planning, risk management, effective decision making, group dynamics, and environmental stewardship. In addition, it will cover outdoor skills such as rock climbing and paddling.

MECH 408 - CAPSTONE DESIGN PROJECT II
An interdisciplinary capstone design experience in mechanical engineering. This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and skills acquired in previous courses to the solution of a realistic engineering problem. Teams of students will specify, design, and build a system to meet a prescribed set of requirements. The topics covered in this course will include design methodology, effective teamwork, project management, documentation, and presentation skills.

MGMT 609 - MANAGING ENERGY TRANSITIONS
Managing in a Carbon-Constrained World” focuses on the business challenges and opportunities presented by the fast-changing dynamics of climate change and renewable/alternative sources of energy - at the international, federal, and state levels. Consideration will be given to successes and failures of “first movers.” We will consider how to reconcile conflicts between the goal of a lower carbon future and the priorities of energy security and restoring a strong, sustainable, economy. The course will close with corporate responses to the challenge. The course is intended to benefit students who intend to pursue careers as leaders in industry, finance, government, diplomacy, international agencies, non-government organizations (NGO’s), media, or in academia. The course will challenge you to understand diverse points of view. A background in economics, finance, management, engineering, or public policy will provide a strong foundation, but other disciplines may also apply.

MGMT 713 - STRATEGIC ISSUES FOR GLOBAL BUSINESS
Seeks to provide students with the skills, knowledge and sensitivity required to attain and maintain sustainable competitive advantage within a global environment. Emphasizes a strategic perspective and highlights topics such as global environment analysis, global strategy, global strategic alliances, and the important role of organizational structure and strategic control.

MGMT 769 - WASTE MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP
Waste Management (WM)has established a formal internship program with the Jones Graduate School of Management (JGSM) at Rice University in order to give students more exposure to the emerging field of sustainable solutions. Students will gain valuable experience in the launch of new enterprises within WM and associated deal analysis.

MGMT 860 - BUSINESS ETHICS
This course addresses moral obligations of firms and managers. The focus is on preparing for moral leadership and professionalism. Emphasis is on readings concerning best business practices and cases concerning effective versus ineffective handling of ethical analysis and moral issues. Topics include relationship of business ethics and laws, corporate social responsibility, sustainability, and human rights.

POLI 331 - ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY
The course considers the major issues in the increasingly important public policy area of the environment. It emphasizes the American experience, but also considers certain international aspects of these issues. Cross-list: ENST 331.

POLI 362 - COMPARATIVE URBAN POLITICS AND POLICY
This course offers a broad overview of urban politics and policies in cities around the world. We will examine how national, regional and local forces shape the processes and outcomes governance within and across cities and metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to critical problems and policies that affect urban centers: growth, immigration, class conflict, public order, service management, education, housing transportation, environmental protection, sustainability, land-use planning and spatial competition.

POLI 441 - COMMON PROPERTY RESOURCES
Common Property Resources (CPRs), such as fisheries, aquifers, and the Internet, appear in many guises and pose a fundamental problem for governing. Exploration of theoretical underpinnings for CPRs, their growing literature, and the political and economic institutions mediating CPR dilemmas. Included is an original research project in conjunction with the instructor. Cross-list: ENST 441.

POLI 464/562 - RESEARCH SEMINAR ON COMPARATIVE URBAN POLITICS AND POLICY
This course offers a broad overview of urban politics and policies in cities around the world. We will examine how national, regional and local forces shape the processes and outcomes governance within and across cities and metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to critical problems and policies that affect urban centers: growth, immigration, class conflict, public order, service management, education, housing transportation, environmental protection, sustainability, land-use planning and spatial competition.

POST 201 - BAKER INSTITUTE INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY
Baker Institute fellows will rotate through the course, introducing students to a variety of public policy issues. Among them will be energy, taxes, health care, religion and politics, science, space, information technology, urban problems, environment, and international relations. One research paper will be required.

POST 401 - ENERGY POLICY
Energy is credited with many contradictory properties. It is a curse that enables dictatorship and war, undermines the work ethic, and taints our environment. It is also the world's largest business and a chief ingredient of state power, stitching together disparate countries in webs of mutual dependence. Energy shapes our physical landscapes and personal habits, providing services that make us comfortable and secure, while producing waste that threatens this way of life. These are the areas where energy and politics intersect, the topics of concern to this course. We will discuss global trends in the production and use of energy, its impact on the environment, and the geopolitical issues around energy security and trade. We will explore theoretical debates about energy's influence on governance and development, and ponder the future roles of big exporters in the Middle East and growing centers of demand in Asia. We will study innovations and events that have reshaped the energy landscape in the United States and other big consumers, and look at policies that are shifting economies away from fossil fuels and nuclear power. We will also get involved in these debates, drafting recommendations intended to inform government policy.

RELI 158/548 - LIBERATION THEOLOGIES
This course seeks to acquaint students with examples of liberation theology, as they relate to the following issues: racism, sexism, classism, and environmental destruction.Attention is given to the context, construction, form, and aims of Latin American liberation theology, Black theology, Feminist theology, and Theology in the Intersections.

RELI 301/515 - RELIGIOUS THOUGHT
Nietzsche's thought and background: his impact on religious thinkers and cultural critics; his influence on understanding of God, faith, values, society; his connection with Schopenhauer, Wagner, Tillich, Mann, Barth, Buber, Freud, Jung, D.H. Lawrence,Heidegger, anti-bourgeois cultural criticism, environmentalism, feminism, and postmodernism.

SOCI 316 - ENVIRONMENTAL FILM
Explores the ways film represents the environment and environmental issues (food, water, energy, waste, environmental justice, sustainability), and both expresses and shapes environmental values. We will view and analyze a variety of genres, as well as reading supplementary material. Cross-list: ENST 316.

SOCI 342 - SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION
This course explores how the process of global integration transforms human life with specific emphasis on: the global economy and economic development; transnational political organizations; culture an identity; the effect of globalization on social stratification, including gender/race/ethnic inequalities; transnational migration; environmental change; and transnational social movements.

SOCI 367 - ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
This course focuses on the foundations of environmental sociology and takes a social and historical approach to examine how humans affect the environment and the environment affects humans. Topics include: agricultural sustainability, resource extraction and climate changes; environmental racism/sexism; globalization and development; population, and consumption, and environmental movements. Cross-list: ENST 367.

SOCI 415 - THE ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENT
Examines the environmental movement in the U.S. and globally. After a historical overview,we will use a social movement perspective to examine mobilization,organizations and tactics, ideologies and identities, as well as exploring aspects of contemporary environmentalism (e.g. green building and slow flood, wildlife management/biodiversity, sustainable development, environmental justice). Cross-list: ENST 415.

SPAN 403 - LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN LATIN AMERICA
This course aims to offer students a systematic contact with a representative sample of the literature and scholarship about the mutual relationships between human societies and their natural environments, particularly but not exclusively in Latin America. Taught in Spanish.

STAT 639 - EXTREME VALUE THEORY
Extreme Value Theory is used in many areas such as financial markets, risk management, environmental studies, as well as network design. In this course we will study the theory and practice of extreme value theory.